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Old 05.08.2019, 05:38 PM   #7001
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek
I'm glad that you're not buying into ilduclo's nonsense. That article was overly positive yet he chose to copy and paste the only negative paragraph. Sad!
ildouche doesn’t listen to anyone who disagrees with him. he’s got everyone on ignore. i guess he’s ignoring you too now.

me, i don’t care for cognitive closure. the whole point of a forum is to discuss shit.
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Old 05.08.2019, 05:46 PM   #7002
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And people say that progressives are the close minded speech nazis haaaaaa
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Old 05.08.2019, 06:18 PM   #7003
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some are, lol

but anyway...
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Old 05.08.2019, 06:41 PM   #7004
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Exactly, they're hypocrites!
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Old 05.09.2019, 03:13 AM   #7005
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After much consideration, I have decided, very reluctantly, to end any lingering residual support for Bernie Sanders for President. This is due to Senator Sanders' support for general reenfanchisement of all convicted felons, including those still serving their sentences, as well as those convicted of violent felonies. While I, myself, strongly support automatic reenfanchisement of non-violent first-time drug offenders (I.e., true victims of the racist "War on Drugs"), Senator Sanders' support for the indiscriminate reenfanchisement of ALL convicted felons makes a mockery of the criminal justice system, as well as access to the franchise, which is due to law-abiding citizens, as opposed to those who have excluded themselves from society by virtue of their conduct.

Ultimately, Senator Sanders' position on this issue is yet one more example of the Democratic Party's preference of the lumpenproletariat over the proletariat, which they've already expressed in many other ways ((I.e., preference of illegal aliens over lawfully authorised workers, efforts to organize "sex workers").
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Old 05.09.2019, 04:08 AM   #7006
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Nancy Pelosi claims she has a Constitutional crisis on her hands, as Attorney General Barr has disregarded her "deadline" to reveal the full, unredacted Mueller report to Congress.

That this is the cheapest form of political grandstanding is obvious to anyone who understands that:

1) the Attorney General is not required by law to release ANY of the Special Prosecutor's report to ANYONE;

2) certain items contained within the Special Prosecutor's report are justifiability classified, such as grand jury testimony and intelligence which might reveal sources and methods of acquisition.

Kindly notice the fact that, through the two years of the Mueller investigation. President Trump never invoked Executive Privilege until Congress demanded that Attorney General Barr break the law to satisfy their demands

What Speaker Pelosi is attempting is something I learned about when I was a Trotskyist in college, to which Trotsky referred as his "Transitional Program", which consists In the raising of demands, in a revolutionary or pre-revolutionary situation, which are immediately understood by the people to be necessary to the maintenance of human life and the proper functioning of society, yet beyond the ability of the ruling class to deliver, given the social crisis existing at the moment. In the case of the Russian Revolution, ending Russia's participation in the First World War proved to be just such a demand, and the success of the October Revolution was assured by the raising of this demand against the Kerensky government.

So, Speaker Pelosi is trying the same thing by demanding that the Attorney General break the law by releasing the unredacted Mueller report to Congress. But her demand on this point is nowhere near the critical importance of the Bolshevik Party's demand for exit from alliance with the Allied Powers in the First World War, nor is it understandable nor supportable by the broad masses of the people.

In the same vein, the Violence Against Women Act could easily have been extended by an easy bi-partisan majority, save for the fact that she refused to bring it up to a vote until it had expired, and then offered it up as a new piece of legislation containing an anti-Second Amendment poison pill which she knew Republicans could not possibly support. Besides the obvious question as to why the Violence Against Women Act needed a sunset provision, there remains the issue of Speaker Pelosi accusing Republicans of being in favor of violence against women, when her own deliberate policy of legislative sabotage caused the impasse.
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Old 05.09.2019, 05:37 AM   #7007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bytor Peltor
BARR is bulletproof......

 


From last I heard eleven hours ago, not one Democrat has entered the Secure Room to read the 99.9% unredacted version.

A) they don’t want to know the truth
B) they already know the truth

Either way, all their grandstanding won’t change a thing!
(Shut Up Jerry)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Schunk
Nancy Pelosi claims she has a Constitutional crisis on her hands, as Attorney General Barr has disregarded her "deadline" to reveal the full, unredacted Mueller report to Congress.

That this is the cheapest form of political grandstanding is obvious to anyone who understands that:

1) the Attorney General is not required by law to release ANY of the Special Prosecutor's report to ANYONE;

2) certain items contained within the Special Prosecutor's report are justifiability classified, such as grand jury testimony and intelligence which might reveal sources and methods of acquisition.

Kindly notice the fact that, through the two years of the Mueller investigation. President Trump never invoked Executive Privilege until Congress demanded that Attorney General Barr break the law to satisfy their demands

What Speaker Pelosi is attempting is something I learned about when I was a Trotskyist in college, to which Trotsky referred as his "Transitional Program", which consists In the raising of demands, in a revolutionary or pre-revolutionary situation, which are immediately understood by the people to be necessary to the maintenance of human life and the proper functioning of society, yet beyond the ability of the ruling class to deliver, given the social crisis existing at the moment. In the case of the Russian Revolution, ending Russia's participation in the First World War proved to be just such a demand, and the success of the October Revolution was assured by the raising of this demand against the Kerensky government.

So, Speaker Pelosi is trying the same thing by demanding that the Attorney General break the law by releasing the unredacted Mueller report to Congress. But her demand on this point is nowhere near the critical importance of the Bolshevik Party's demand for exit from alliance with the Allied Powers in the First World War, nor is it understandable nor supportable by the broad masses of the people.

In the same vein, the Violence Against Women Act could easily have been extended by an easy bi-partisan majority, save for the fact that she refused to bring it up to a vote until it had expired, and then offered it up as a new piece of legislation containing an anti-Second Amendment poison pill which she knew Republicans could not possibly support. Besides the obvious question as to why the Violence Against Women Act needed a sunset provision, there remains the issue of Speaker Pelosi accusing Republicans of being in favor of violence against women, when her own deliberate policy of legislative sabotage caused the impasse.
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Old 05.10.2019, 10:10 AM   #7008
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this one is for the non-illiterates

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opini...ideas-collide/

Trump’s two worst economic ideas collide
Catherine Rampell

At 12:01 a.m. Friday, President Trump’s two worst economic ideas finally collided — and made each other even worse.

To be sure, there are a lot of terrible economic theories espoused by this president (tax cuts pay for themselves, government shutdowns are fun, scam artists should roam free, etc.). But the specific bad ideas I’m referring to are:

1. Trade wars are good and easy to win; and
2. It’s smart for the president to publicly bash the Federal Reserve.

Last fall, Trump began loudly complaining about the Fed’s interest rate hikes, in defiance of a multidecade-long policy for the White House to never comment on Fed decisions. The reason for this norm is clear: Central banks must be politically independent in both practice and perception in order to credibly commit to stable prices. If the public believes that politicians rather than independent technocrats control the printing press, inflation can easily spiral out of control. Lots of other countries throughout history (Venezuela, Argentina, pre-euro Italy) have served as cautionary tales.

But none of that mattered to Trump. He has been throwing tantrums about the Fed’s modest interest rate increases, claiming that they threaten both the U.S. economy and his presidency. At one point, there were even reports that Trump was considering taking the unprecedented and cataclysmic step of firing the Fed chair whom he appointed, Jerome H. Powell.

Markets paid attention. As it turns out, China did, too.

According to the Wall Street Journal, Beijing noticed Trump’s latest Fed-related outbursts and interpreted them as evidence that the president was freaked out about the underlying health of the U.S. economy. They suggested that he might be secretly desperate to make a deal, any deal, with China:

Quote:
Originally Posted by wsj
Mr. Trump’s hectoring of Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell to cut interest rates was seen in Beijing as evidence that the president thought the U.S. economy was more fragile than he claimed ...

An April 30 tweet, in which Mr. Trump coupled criticism of Mr. Powell with praise of Chinese economic policy, especially caught the eye of senior officials. “China is adding great stimulus to its economy while at the same time keeping interest rates low,” Mr. Trump tweeted. “Our Federal Reserve has incessantly lifted interest rates.”

“Why would you be constantly asking the Fed to lower rates if your economy is not turning weak,” said Mei Xinyu, an analyst at a think tank affiliated with China’s Commerce Ministry. If the U.S.’s resolve was weakening, the thinking in Beijing went, the U.S. would be more willing to cut a deal, even if Beijing hardened its positions.

In other words, our dealmaker in chief failed to realize that berating the Fed not only harms the long-run credibility of the central bank; it also hurt his near-term negotiating position with China.

After previously expressing a willingness to make serious concessions, China started playing hardball. Negotiations broke down, and then Trump responded by more than doubling existing tariffs on $200 billion of Chinese imports, from 10 percent to 25 percent, on Friday. He has also threatened to add tariffs to an additional $325 billion in Chinese goods that aren’t currently taxed.

Trump seems to believe that these tariffs are an end unto themselves because they are bringing “wealth” into the country by forcing China to pay “billions” into the U.S. Treasury:

Quote:
Originally Posted by trump tweet
 

Talks with China continue in a very congenial manner - there is absolutely no need to rush - as Tariffs are NOW being paid to the United States by China of 25% on 250 Billion Dollars worth of goods & products. These massive payments go directly to the Treasury of the U.S....

This is, to be clear, incorrect.

Two separate studies by separate teams of all-star economists have found that 100 percent of the tariffs Trump has imposed so far are being passed along to, and paid by, U.S. consumers. One of those studies also found that workers in heavily Republican counties were being hurt the most by Trump’s trade wars, thanks to both the tariffs the president has imposed on our imports and the tit-for-tat retaliation other countries have slapped on our exports.

In other words, Trump’s Fed war has worsened his trade war. And in a particularly painful, the trade war might also soon heighten his Fed war.

After all, worsening trade tensions could put the Fed in a bind. An escalation in tariffs is likely to increase uncertainty, slow down business investment and hiring, and ultimately drag on growth. But it might also raise prices, since as those studies I cited note, the cost of the tariffs so far has been passed through to U.S. consumers.

That first effect — slowing growth — would nudge the Fed toward looser monetary policy. The second effect — higher inflation — could instead nudge the Fed toward tighter monetary policy. If a spike in inflation is clearly from a transitory shock (such as a one-time increase in tariffs), Fed officials should ignore it; but even so, it might be hard to tell in the moment what’s behind any given change in the pace of price growth.

Powell acknowledged these challenges when asked by Marketplace’s Kai Ryssdal last year about the tools available if trade wars slow the economy:

Quote:
Originally Posted by marketplace
Powell: ... We essentially have our our interest rate tool, so if the economy weakens, we can lower interest rates. We can slow the pace at which we’re increasing them. There could be an effect on inflation. I wouldn’t want to, you know, dive into a bunch of hypotheticals here, but I would say, you can imagine situations which would be very challenging, where inflation is going up and the economy is weakening.

Ryssdal: And you’re lowering rates all the same, just waiting for stuff to get better.

Powell: Again, it’s not at all clear how it would evolve. Inflation could move up, just sort of a step up in the price level, which wouldn’t affect future inflation, and that would be something you tend to look through what we call a supply shock. But this will, it it’ll have to be a question that we think about. But again I don’t want to get into a lot of hypotheticals. I just think at this point we’re watching carefully and hoping for a good result.

Basically, escalating trade tensions could make the central bank’s already very difficult job even more difficult — and thereby provide even more fodder for Trump to complain about Fed policies.

The moral of the story: Neither trade wars nor Fed wars are good and easy to win. But especially not when fought simultaneously.
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Old 05.10.2019, 10:44 AM   #7009
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So what do you think will be the outcome of all this?
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Down with this sort of thing.
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Old 05.10.2019, 11:05 AM   #7010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by h8kurdt
So what do you think will be the outcome of all this?
well, i don’t have a crystal ball, and if powell can’t tell how could i possibly, but besides universal pain and suffering from a global recession (lol) seems to me the marketwatch exchange with powell signals a risk for stagflation, which is when you have economic decline and high unemployment, but prices go up (instead of down due to lack of demand). stagnation + inflation.

last thing this happened here was in the 70s—actually started before the oil crisis and continued after. that’s what ushered in thatcherism and reaganomics.

eta: actually it was milton friedman’s monetarism that got us out of stagflation. but after the last recession there is not a lot of room to cut interest rates and stimulate the economy.
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Old 05.10.2019, 11:06 AM   #7011
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Old 05.11.2019, 08:41 PM   #7012
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again, not for functional illiterates



I led a platoon in Iraq. Trump is wrong to pardon war criminals.
Soldiers pay attention to example. Murderous leaders command murderous units.

By Waitman Wade Beorn
Waitman Wade Beorn, a combat veteran of Iraq, is a Holocaust and genocide studies historian, a lecturer at the University of Virginia, and the author of “Marching Into Darkness: The Wehrmacht and the Holocaust in Belarus.” He is a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point.

May 9

In early 2003, as a cavalry officer, I stood in front of my scout platoon at dusk after a long day preparing to deploy to Iraq. I spoke with them about the law of war and how they should treat civilians when we got into theater. It wasn’t a long conversation, but I felt that giving clear guidance about what was acceptable — and not acceptable — was important. They should treat the civilians as they would neighbors, I told them. Soldiers take most seriously the things their leadership makes most serious.

On Monday, President Trump pardoned the convicted war criminal Michael Behenna, who had murdered Ali Mansur, an unarmed, naked Iraqi, by shooting him in the head and chest. Making a specious claim of self-defense, Behenna argued that Mansur threw a piece of concrete at him and “ stood up like he’s coming at me.” And so he neutralized this threat, a naked man, already released by the Army. Behenna was supposed to be returning Mansur home to his village. A military court convicted Behenna of unpremeditated murder. American soldiers testified against him. The military court of appeals and a review panel upheld that conviction, though he was paroled early, in 2014.

Even before pardoning Behenna, Trump demonstrated a disturbing flippancy toward war crimes. He has repeatedly expressed support for former Navy SEAL Edward Gallagher, another alleged war criminal. Gallagher’s own men told investigators that he had, according to the New York Times, “shot a girl in a flower-print hijab who was walking with other girls on the riverbank.” In 2017, Gallagher walked up to a 15-year-old prisoner of war and “stabbed the wounded teenager several times in the neck and once in the chest with his hunting knife, killing him.” He then texted images of his “kill” to friends. Even in the tightknit Special Operations community, fellow SEALs were horrified and repeatedly reported Gallagher’s behavior until charges were brought. He faces court-martial at the end of the month. Trump tweeted that Gallagher would be given better conditions in confinement “in honor of his past service,” an honor many would say he threw away long ago.

Trump has also publicly supported Maj. Matt Golsteyn, who is charged with premeditated murder in the shooting of an unarmed man and the burning of his body in Afghanistan. “I will be reviewing the case of a ‘U.S. Military hero,’ ” the president tweeted.

In at least three instances, then, our commander in chief appears to have preferred to overlook serious war crimes in favor of a warped notion of patriotism and heroism. Trump subscribes to a “bad things happen in war” mentality — odd for a man who actively avoided military service.

This attitude is incredibly dangerous. It doesn’t just undermine the enforcement of military justice; it also sends a message to our armed forces about just what kind of conduct the United States takes seriously.

In my book “Marching Into Darkness,” I wrote about the German army’s participation in the Holocaust at the small-unit level. One conclusion was that, even given the premeditated, racist and highly ideologized environment of the Wehrmacht, the culture of each unit and the institutional leadership most directly influenced whether war crimes were committed. Murderous leaders led murderous units, I found.

Fortunately, the U.S. military does not exist in this kind of ethical quagmire. Compared with our opponents in the modern age, we have taken much more care to prosecute warfare in accordance with the laws of war. We have systems of military education that highlight our values and the law of armed conflict. And we have a military justice system that, while not perfect, prosecutes and condemns those service members who commit atrocities. In short, we have a foundation of military ethics that our combat leaders can stand on.

But what happens when that ethical foundation erodes or crumbles? There are things we can learn from the German military and the Holocaust that are relevant today — without arguing that we are Nazis. One lesson is the influence of an institution’s culture on criminal behavior during wartime. The German state intentionally created such a culture (another important distinction from the current situation). Before a German soldier set foot in the Soviet Union, he received several unmistakable clues about what behavior would be acceptable. The Commissar Order explicitly called for the summary execution of all Red Army political officers, an act that violated all laws of war, including those that Germany was party to. Also, the guidelines for German troops, disseminated the day before the invasion, stated that “this war demands ruthless and aggressive action against Bolshevik agitators, snipers, saboteurs, and Jews and tireless elimination of any active or passive resistance.” “Passive resistance” would be interpreted liberally. Last, and most striking in light of Trump’s pardon of Behenna, was the Jurisdiction Order. Issued in May 1941 directly by Adolf Hitler, it informed troops that “for offenses committed by members of the Wehrmacht and its employees against enemy civilians, prosecution is not compulsory, not even if the offense is at the same time a military crime or violation.” Soldiers were literally told that they would not be tried for behavior that would be a crime anywhere else in Europe.

The Wehrmacht proceeded to commit some of the worst atrocities in the history of modern warfare on a scale that obviously dwarfs anything we have seen in Iraq or Afghanistan. But the underlying lessons remain valid. Murderous leaders led murderous units. Soldiers took their cues from the guidance they were given and the examples they were shown. They were often more likely to commit war crimes because of their commanders’ signaling than because of Nazi ideology. (In my research on the Wehrmacht, I also discovered the corollary to be true: Leaders opposed to criminality led units that did not commit crimes.)

When Trump champions war criminals as brave patriots who are simply victims of political correctness, he seems to push for a climate that condones unethical and criminal behavior. He appears to write off war crimes as the cost of doing business. If this is the example our military is given, we should not be surprised to see more Behennas and Gallaghers. Referring to the infamous Army “kill team ” in Afghanistan in 2009-2010, a senior military official noted the importance of the brigade commander’s aggressive guidance, which rejected any attempt to “win hearts and minds.” The official observed that “clearly, the guys who were pulling the trigger are the proximate cause of the crime, but the culture itself is the enabler.”

No reasonable person would claim that Trump is Hitler or that the U.S. military is the German army in World War II. Cases like those stand out as so horrific precisely because the American military has the strong ethical foundation the Wehrmacht lacked and generally does not commit war crimes. But the dynamics of units in combat at ground level can be strikingly similar across time and space, and so we ignore historical lessons at our peril. Perhaps that’s why one case study from my research on the German army and the Holocaust forms the foundation of a training module for the U.S. military in conjunction with the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and West Point. It is used by ROTC programs and military units across the country.

Leaders are constantly making policy, by what they do — and by what they don’t do. Trump’s posture endangers our deployed men and women by betraying the trust of host nations that we will prosecute those rare individuals who commit crimes against their people.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlo...013_story.html
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Old 05.13.2019, 04:37 AM   #7013
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[quote=!@#$%!]again, not for functional illiterates



I led a platoon in Iraq. Trump is wrong to pardon war criminals.
Soldiers pay attention to example. Murderous leaders command murderous units.

By Waitman Wade Beorn
Waitman Wade Beorn, a combat veteran of Iraq, is a Holocaust and genocide studies historian, a lecturer at the University of Virginia, and the author of “Marching Into Darkness: The Wehrmacht and the Holocaust in Belarus.” He is a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point.


***


I, myself, have major difficulties with the President's statements during the 2016 campaign supporting torture of POWs. I tended at that time to discount such statements for two reasons: 1) the promised withdrawal of the US from the "world policeman" role seemed to reduce the exposure of US military personnel to the risk of losing Geneva Convention protection in the event of their own capture (I'll remind you that my own grandfather was a POW in the First World War), and 2) the reluctance of any potential future "host nations" to allow US troops on their soil would help prevent any possible post-Trump reversion to the Bush, Jr./Obama era of imperial policing. It was a cynical calculation, to be sure, yet that was my thinking at that time.

I was not then aware that such a Neo-Conservative hawk as John Bolton, one of the chief architects of the Iraq War which Trump denounced as a Presidential candidate, would become as important a White House advisor as he now clearly is. Let's just say that I am now highly nervous.

Yet Beorn's argument stressing the criminality of the Trump administration seems to forget that the President's pardon simply restored Behenna's civil rights. It did not prevent his prosecution, nor did it release him from prison, as his (admittedly early) release occurred during the administration of the Nobel Peace Prize-winning President Obama. Indeed, the restoration of Behenna's civil rights would automatically occur under Bernie Sanders' and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez' plan for the reenfanchisement en masse of incarcerees. Further, President Trump has, as of yet, taken no official action in favor of either Gallagher or Golsteyn.
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Old 05.13.2019, 07:19 AM   #7014
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lmao. that article wasn’t about who can vote. it’s about leadership.
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Old 05.13.2019, 07:58 AM   #7015
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lmao. that article wasn’t about who can vote. it’s about leadership.

I fully realize that, as you can clearly see my reservations concerning President Trump's leadership in my reply, yet Beorn still seems to be suffering a bit from Trump Derangement Syndrome (TDS), in that he not only fails to note Trump's campaign statements WHICH I ACKNOWLEDGED, but limits himself to accusing Trump of things of which his predecessors in office are at least as guilty (such as President Obama's having protected those more immediately involved in the Kunduz hospital attack from international jurisprudence), and ignoring the actual impact of the President's post-release pardon, in the light of statements made by those running against Trump from the left. Kindly re-read my entire piece carefully.
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Old 05.13.2019, 08:20 AM   #7016
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please

your rube goldberg justifications are the derangement
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Old 05.13.2019, 08:28 AM   #7017
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please

your rube goldberg justifications are the derangement

I am not justifying anything. I am, as I've long said I am, quite disturbed by the Trump administration''s warlike tendencies, as well as his campaign-era endorsement of war crimes. I'm also pointing out Beorn's concentration on Trump's actions to date, at the expense of any serious discussion of Trump's predecessors' actions in regard to the subject at hand.
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Old 05.13.2019, 08:41 AM   #7018
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I am not justifying anything. I am, as I've long said I am, quite disturbed by the Trump administration''s warlike tendencies, as well as his campaign-era endorsement of war crimes. I'm also pointing out Beorn's concentration on Trump's actions to date, at the expense of any serious discussion of Trump's predecessors' actions in regard to the subject at hand.


“i am quite disturbed but what about irrelevant whataboutisms”
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Old 05.17.2019, 04:11 PM   #7019
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Repub FCC Commissioner Michael O'Reilly spoke to an audience of debt collectors at ACA International. Debt collectors are one of the country's most zealous users of robocalls, a tool they deploy to hound people in debt.

"Repeat after me," O'Reilly said, "'Robocall is not a bad word."
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Old 05.18.2019, 07:41 PM   #7020
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They hound me about student loan debt I don't have
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