View Single Post
Old 06.02.2016, 02:00 PM   #13
!@#$%!
invito al cielo
 
!@#$%!'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: mars attacks
Posts: 40,359
!@#$%! kicks all y'all's asses!@#$%! kicks all y'all's asses!@#$%! kicks all y'all's asses!@#$%! kicks all y'all's asses!@#$%! kicks all y'all's asses!@#$%! kicks all y'all's asses!@#$%! kicks all y'all's asses!@#$%! kicks all y'all's asses!@#$%! kicks all y'all's asses!@#$%! kicks all y'all's asses!@#$%! kicks all y'all's asses
Quote:
Originally Posted by tesla69
Diet for a Small Planet had a recipe to make yogurt at home with dried milk, I need to find that. Store yogurt is getting really expensive, and there is the current fetish for "greek" yogurt which is even more expensive.

[yogurt + old tshirt + gravity]*12hours = greek yogurt + acid whey

you can use the whey for "whey lemonade" (add a bit of honey), to soak beans, or to add to baked goods

i don't know about making yogurt from dry milk because dry milk is nonfat, which makes for shitty-ass yogurt texture. i use whole milk and wouldn't go below 2%.

this is the easiest way to make yogurt i swear, no thermometer required (i have a thermometer but gave it up)

1) heat up your milk (1qt to 1 gallon) in a thick-bottom pot at a low fire. COVERED so you don't get mega-scum (scum forms due to different temp between hot milk and cool air)

2) the milk will have scalded when it's got a thick foam on top but hasn't boiled yet. a low fire helps here so that it won't suddenly overboil.

3) pour your scalded milk into a clean GLASS container. can be a crock, a pitcher, a mason jar, whatever. this sterilizes the jar. close it/cover it.

4) inoculate the milk when the temperature is still hot but warm to the touch. that means you can hold the jar in your hands and it feels hot but doesn't burn. if it burns it's too hot.

for the inoculation you can use:
-an envelope of direct-set yogurt culture (i use yogourmet)
-an heirloom yogurt culture like those they sell at culturesforHEALTH.com
-last week's yogurt (i use 1/2 cup for 1 gallon)
-a small container of plain yogurt (i hear dannon is good)

direct set/ commercial yogurts will carry on a few batches like a sourdough, but eventually get a little weird. heirloom cultures can go on indefinitely however (as they have for millennia) if you keep them well.

5) incubate in a warm place, like an oven with the light on. for a mild yogurt, 4 hours should do for one quart. because the culture grows exponentially, a gallon should be ready in about 5-6 hours. but that's for mild. for a tart and fully lactose-free yogurt, leave it longer. i sometimes leave it 18 hours out if i can't get it really warm.

6) EAT.

notes: this doesn't need any kind of high-tech shit. yogurt has been fermented since before we had science. throw your fear out of the window and fuck around with your recipe until it works for you.
!@#$%! is offline   |QUOTE AND REPLY|