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Old 06.21.2017, 08:47 AM   #1281
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HenryHill51
I think part of this is true regarding US TV versus European TV. At the very least, European TV was willing to produce some pretty heady stuff in the 70's and 80's. German TV financed Rainer Werner Fassbinder over the course of two decades and series like "World On A Wire", "Berlin Alexanderplitz" and the newly re-restored "Eight Hours Are Not A Day"- besides being proclaimed as masterpieces now- were adventurous attempts for TV series/movies. Likewise, French filmmakers such as Jacques Rivette ("Out 1"), Marcel Ophuls (a host of WW2 documentaries) and Maurice Pialat ("A House in the Woods") all ventured into the TV realm. I know there's alot more I've forgotten.

American TV, during that same time, were content with freakin' "Hunter" or "Cagney and Lacey". Perhaps the most "adventurous" we got was financing Marvin Chomsky's "Holocaust" series or something like "Roots".....ambitious, historically moving ideas wrapped behind a fairly safe and recognizable facade. I suppose "Twin Peaks" in the early 90's was the greatest leap for American production and then followed by HBO's trailblazing one-two punch of "The Wire" and "The Sopranos". Thirty years later.....

ok so this from the movies

yeah, 90s tv was a huge leap i think. maybe due to cultural/generational changes?

twin peaks sure, at least the first season. but also seinfeld. also of course the simpsons which as i recall used to be deemed dangerous for children, or something. and lesser things that are now forgotten that brought both formal + content changes to tv. there was a thing called northern exposure that brought a bit of magical realism to the screen. then an even more forgotten thing now, parker lewis something something, which was a bit shit but i think it had a postmodern approach to tv-- i can't remember much of what happened (except that everyone was white, lol) but i do recall being impressed by the way stories were told. i wish i could find it/rewatch it/ think about it. then there was stuff on mtv like liquid television and was it cartoon sushi? oh yeah. that was the testing ground for today's adult animation. shit like aeon flux was insane at the time. this so-called golden age of american tv was brewing for a long time before it made it big.
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