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Old 05.12.2008, 08:28 AM   #17
o o o
the destroyed room
 
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o o o kicks all y'all's asseso o o kicks all y'all's asseso o o kicks all y'all's asseso o o kicks all y'all's asseso o o kicks all y'all's asseso o o kicks all y'all's asseso o o kicks all y'all's asseso o o kicks all y'all's asseso o o kicks all y'all's asseso o o kicks all y'all's asseso o o kicks all y'all's asses
A few weeks ago, I read "Burma Chronicles", a comic book by Guy Delisle about his experience in the country - he lived there more than a year. It is really an interesting read to know more about life in Burma. His wife was working for Médecins Sans Frontières France, so many parts of the book relate the difficulties that are encountering NGOs in the country.

At the end of the book, we learn that MSF France eventually decided to leave the country, as the junta forces them to work in regions that should not be priority regions because they are not conflict-ridden, not the most disadvantaged, not politically-discriminated, etc. whereas MSF France wanted to focus on the eastern part of the country, which has no health system, no doctors, no medication, and where there live minorities that are abandoned by the junta in power. For years, MSF has been trying to approach these regions building progressively national and local agreements, opening one clinic after the other towards the east (they are also trying to access those regions from Thailand, crossing the border illegally), but in the end they still cannot go where they want to go: so after all, they felt they became an accomplice of the junta and an instrument of discrimination.

After reading all this, I can imagine how humanitarian aid is currently manipulated or blocked by the junta...
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