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Old 04.25.2007, 02:22 PM   #12
nature scene
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I'm not trying to downplay the seriousness of missing bees here, but there are some major issues with claiming that GM crops are responsible. Much more research would need to be done to test this hypothesis, especially since several reputable scientific publications have provided evidence to the contrary.

Several studies indicate that Bt corn is not connected to Colony Collapse Disorder or any other dying insect problems.

For example, the Journal of Apicultural Research published a study in 2003 that tested two types of Bt corn pollen, CrylA(b) and CrylF, on honeybee larvae. The study observed no significant differences between the transgenic pollen and the non-transgenic pollen on bees fed a dose of 1.5 mg/larva of pollen. The EPA published a "Biopesticides Registration Action Document" in 2005 which reviewed research on Bt corn pollen, Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1, which found no abnormalities in honeybee larvae fed 2 mg/larva of pollen.

In 2001 the scientific journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences published six comprehensive studies that showed that Bt corn pollen does not pose a risk to monarch populations for the following reasons:
The density of Bt corn pollen that overlay milkweed leaves in the environment rarely comes close to the levels needed to harm monarch butterflies. Both laboratory and field studies confirmed this.
There is limited overlap between the period that Bt corn sheds pollen and when caterpillars are present.
Only a portion of the monarch caterpillar population feeds on milkweeds in and near cornfields.
(Sears, et al., 2001)

Three other problems:
1) Bees only collect a very small percentage of pollen from corn.
2) I believe the Bt protein used in corn is specific for lepidopteran insects so is not toxic to bees.
3) The supposed toxins in GM crops would not have immediate lethal effects, yet dead bees are not being found in hives, suggesting that they are dying in the fields.


The major thing here is that, as !@#$% said, we don't know the cause of CCD. At this point anything connecting GM crops or cell phone use to disapperaing bees is pure speculation. Another example is a claim that climate change may be causing bees to disappear, could be true, but for now it's only speculation. So spare me the "Monsanto hates America" bullshit and try getting your information from scientific publications rather than newspapers.
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